Interactive information

Three little thoughts on interacting with information about communities, philanthropy, CSR, doing good -

1. Intel's Corporate Social Responsibility department lets you log onto their website and create your own report of their activities. Check it out at http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/corporate-responsibility/csr-report-builder.html. You can get info on their corporate charitable contributions, political contributions, supply chain and other measures. This is cool - it shows that the company is tracking key measures and that it recognizes that we, the users, will want this info in a variety of ways. Unfortunately, you get a static pdf of the data (perhaps machine readable will be next...?)

2. NPR wants to hear from you about who's doing good in your community. Check out their Participation Nation project and send in your 100 word ideas and stories by the end of August. You can email them at participationnation at npr dot org.

3. Stranded in an airport last night, I picked up a copy of Pacific Standard. This magazine, which just changed its name from Miller-McCune, publishes intriguing stories about public policy, data and research (yes, it is possible to make such stories intriguing.) I particularly like the new feature - "Who Funded That" -  in which they provide, citation style, the funding sources of the studies mentioned throughout the articles or from which certain facts are drawn. I wasn't able to find a link to the section online, sadly, so I'm including instead a picture I took of a sample item on the page.



In the digital version of the magazine articles there are links directly to the cited research.  I can provide you this link to information about the publisher of the magazine, The Miller McCune Center for Research, Media and Public Policy.

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